Year III

Exercise on Cubism, Griss’s “Portrait of Picasso” (1912) Unfinsihed

Pencil on Paper. A study on "Portrait of Picasso" by Juan Griss, 1912. The original is an oil on canvas belonging to the movement of "analytical cubism". As with Braq and Picasso, the presence of self-lighted cells create a micro-environment that transcends between subject and surrounding space. The process creates a result where space-time continuum is broken. An excellent example of this can be seen in Dechamp's painting "Nude descendin stairs" where the object appart from beeing able to be seen from different perspectives it also appears to be seen at different points of time.

Pencil on Paper. A study on “Portrait of Picasso” by Juan Griss, 1912. The original is an oil on canvas belonging to the movement of “analytical cubism”. As with Braq and Picasso, in Griss’s work the presence of self-lighted cells create a micro-environment that transcends between subject and surrounding space. The process creates a result where space-time continuum is broken. An excellent example of this can be seen in Duchamp’s painting “Nude descending staircase” where the object apart from being able to be seen from different perspectives it also appears to be seen at different points of time. The term itself “Analytical Cubism” belongs to Griss himself who right after this proceeded to “Synthetic Cubism”. In music, by personal judgment, an example of analytical cubism is the piece by Charles Mingus “A Fogy Day“, track two of the album “Pithecantropus Erectus”, a G. Gerswin track, Mingus attempts to insert in to the music piece sounds of the environment, traffic, horns, etc, but in a tonality that merges with the musical theme.

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5 responses

  1. I would have traded my best paint brushes for a few precious minutes with Picasso and Braque in the early twentieth century!
    AnnMarie 🙂

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    November 5, 2014 at 10:46 am

    • Speaking of brushes!… fancy a particular type/style/type ?

      Like

      November 5, 2014 at 11:07 am

      • I love my Princeton Art Brushes (never realized they’re manufactured in Japan ’til this morning when I read the whole handle).
        Truth be told, I haven’t painted in a while – I’ve traded my brushes for Prisma pencils…for me and my current life – the pencils have become a very portable medium
        AnnMarie 🙂

        Like

        November 5, 2014 at 11:16 am

      • They are great. All those color sticks. I find that they have an auarelish touch, though, the ones you use for your works. And being “aquarelish” they lack the impact and strength. They tend to be more “moody”. I would love to see some of you staff done with a stronger more powerfull medium. Like Tombow markers, or pigma pens. I particularly love them Tombows.

        Like

        November 5, 2014 at 11:30 am

      • I’m always up for suggestions and I greatly appreciate your wisdom. I just might try the Tombows in the near future.
        The way I work with Prismas actually has been straining my wrist a bit – markers might be a nice change to use with my ‘graphic’ pieces… who knows what may happen! It’s always fun to experiment!
        Thank you,
        AnnMarie 🙂

        Like

        November 5, 2014 at 1:26 pm

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